Forums General Customer Relations Injuries, Liabilities, and Release Forms
  • Topic: Release forms

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    • January 14, 2016 5:18 PM CST
    • Release forms

      I have a general release form that is on all the client cards. It talks about behavior and matting.  Recently, I had two clients sign additional one.

      The first was a new client. The note from the previous groomer said that the dog liked to lick the clippers. Of course this is a poodle and she gets her feet shaved.  I decided to make up something showed that she knew the dog licked them and was aware that no matter how careful I am, there is still a chance of the dog getting injured.

       

      The next was on a semi new client. I've done the puppies two other times. One has come up with stifle problems, not uncommon for small dogs. I made up another release today stating that grooming can easily aggravate the injury no matter how careful we are in handling.

       

      Do you do any specialized release forms for behavior or medical problems?

       

       

      Barb

       

       

      ____________________________________

      If you don't go after what you want, you'll never have it. If you don't ask, the answer is always no. If you don't step forward, you're always in the same place.

    • January 15, 2016 6:50 AM CST
    • Release forms

      I don't know how legally binding the releases are, I just threw them together on a whim. It was really more for informational purposes and to document that we did discuss the risks involved in grooming a dog with their particular issues.  If anything should happen, I can refer back to them and remind the owner that we did discuss it and they were aware.

       

      Barb

      ____________________________________

      If you don't go after what you want, you'll never have it. If you don't ask, the answer is always no. If you don't step forward, you're always in the same place.

    • January 16, 2016 9:40 AM CST
    • Release forms

      I don't have releases, I tried it years ago and people were really put off.  My people tell me NOTHING at drop off, I have to call and go "she seems to have a toenail missing and won't put that back leg on the floor after she sits a few minutes..were you aware of this?"  then they tell me what happened.

      some people will tell of moles or hot spots.

      I wonder if a generic release where one could fill in the blank would work?  might be more easily accepted?

      I used to have a matted dog release form, WOW people were really turned off by that.  some would just initial and not read,  most would say "well gosh, I thought you would be good enough to not let the dog get cut or irritated" which told me they had NO understanding of what they did read or the condition they dog was in and would go through to rectify.  

      Now I tell them i will be as careful as possible but do not know what I will find underneath and ask if they realize that peeling the hair off is going to be hard on the dog no matter how careful I am.  I also say; you will need to bring a shirt or sweater back and likely will need to monitor for excessive licking and investigating these newly accessable areas after the hair is removed.

      they don't even want to hear that.

       

    • January 16, 2016 9:56 AM CST
    • Release forms

      My client forms are printed on standard 8 1/2 x 11 paper, then put into a notebook. The top I fill out with name, address, phone numbers, breed, medical issues, etc.  Below that is a short, simple release and a place for them to sign and date under it. Under the release is lined for me to fill in date of grooming, what was done, and charges.  I fill out the top, we discuss the dog and the trim, then while I take the dog and talk to him, feel his coat, etc, I give them the paper to read and sign.  It's just standard operating procedure and not directly targeting them and their dog.  Do they all read it? No. But they do sign it so at least I can say that they were made aware.  I get to know a lot about a person by how they react to it.  I've had 3 or 4 really hesitate and I know then that there may be an issue with the grooming, usually it's in the dog's temperament.  I have never had it looked over by an attorney and I have no idea how it would hold up if needed. I do know that it at least opens up the line of communication and brings up important topics to discuss.

       

      The special releases I've just done, were again more to open the lines of communication than to just make sure I am not blamed for anything.  Often times people have no idea how a grooming is done or the steps to go about it. It's not as simple as just saying not to cut the dog when she licks the clippers. I feel they needed to know that while I will do everything possible to avoid it, IF the dog actually makes contact with the clipper, she WILL get cut. IF the dog with the bad stifle, decides to jerk her leg while I am holding it out to do the pads, she WILL be sore.  It's not something I did to them because I was careless.

       

       

      The skin under a severely tangled or matted coat can become/will be very irritated and sensitive. Under the matting your animal's skin is usually red, swollen, cracked, and dangerous to groom. There are higher chances of nicking or cutting the skin during dematting and/or clipping.

      In the event that your pet is nicked or cut, your signature below authorizes Professional Pet Grooming to obtain veterinary care at your expense. Professional Pet Grooming will not be held responsible for a grooming injury to pets with matted coats. This also includes any after-grooming effects of matt clipping procedures, which could include, but are not limited to the following: itchiness, skin redness or self inflicted irritations/abrasions from excessive external rubbing.

      I understand it is my legal responsibility to disclose, to the best of my knowledge if my pet has bitten, or attempted to bite, anyone in the past . I also understand that I, as the owner, will take full responsibility for all medical costs, as well as recovery costs, including physical therapy and lost wages should my pet ever injure anyone while on the premises.

      ____________________________________

      If you don't go after what you want, you'll never have it. If you don't ask, the answer is always no. If you don't step forward, you're always in the same place.

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    • January 16, 2016 9:13 PM CST
    • Release forms

      We had a lot of user submitted release forms. It's bits and parts of several of them. :)

       

      http://groomers.net/release.html

       

      Barb

      ____________________________________

      If you don't go after what you want, you'll never have it. If you don't ask, the answer is always no. If you don't step forward, you're always in the same place.

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